Best Golf Irons for Mid Handicappers

best golf irons for mid handicappers

For many of us, being a mid handicapper is part of our game. We know we’ll never reach professional level but that doesn’t mean that we want our game to stagnate.

We are always looking at ways to improve our handicap and our game, and one of the best ways to do this is to make sure that we have the best set of irons for the way we play.

As the term mid handicapper covers such a wide range it is hard to recommend just one set of clubs. Every set will help you with different aspects of your game and so it’s very important to do your research before you invest in a set of golf irons.

Here we will take a look at 10 of the best sets of irons which we think will help all mid handicappers.

Best Golf Irons for Mid Handicappers: The Top 10

1. Cleveland Golf Men’s Launcher HB Iron Set

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The Cleveland golf men’s launcher HB iron set is an excellent set for any mid handicapper. It has irons ranging from a 4 to a pitching Wedge, and is for a right handed player. Cleveland have taken their experience in golf club design and created a set using their knowledge of new innovations and design.

This set of irons has been created in for the mid handicapper and uses the latest technology to help you hit the ball higher and straighter. The shaft is made of graphite so you get some flexibility when you hit the ball and combined with the hollow construction, they are also light to swing. The weight of the club is maximized in the club head so this set will even make allowances for those odd mishits we all have.

The innovative design also includes a HiBore crown and this helps you launch the ball higher and the set also features a high strength steel face insert which adds more flex, so you can hit the ball faster. Cleveland have even thought about the look and sound of this set. They’ve added an internal rib design which not only feels good, but sounds good too.

The set has a combination of long and short irons so you can use it to improve your handicap while hitting longer and more accurately.

Key Features
  • Orientation: right handed
  • Shaft: graphite
  • Flex: regular
  • Configuration:4-PW
  • Hollow construction
  • High-strength HT1770 steel face

2. TaylorMade Golf M6 Iron

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TaylorMade is another name well known to golfers and their TaylorMade Golf M6 Irons are everything you would expect from them. The shaft is made from graphite so the set is lightweight with a regular flex which suits most mid handicappers.

The set is configured for right handed players, and includes a 4 iron to Pitching Wedge as well as an Approach Wedge.

These irons also have a Speed Bridge which not only helps increase your speed, but lowers vibrations on impact as well. This helps create a lovely, smooth sound every time you hit the ball. There is a fluted hosel and 360° undercut which lower the center of gravity. Combine this with the off-center inverted cone technology and you get a larger sweet spot and you can also increase the angle and speed of your ball, even if you have a slower swing.

This set is a great choice for mid-handicappers but will suit golfers of all levels just as well.

Key Features
  • Orientation: Right handed
  • Shaft: Graphite
  • Flex: Regular
  • Configuration: 4-PW, AW
  • Speed bridge
  • Fluted hosel

3. Titleist 718 AP1 Iron Set

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The Titleist 718 AP1 Iron Set is another set we recommend for mid handicappers.

The set includes a 4 iron up to a Pitching Wedge, and also has a Gap Wedge in the set. Each iron has a steel shaft to give it extra weight and stability.

The design of these irons will help you get extra speed and accuracy with every shot. The center of gravity is low and each iron benefits from refined tungsten weighting so you can hit the ball a long way with the minimum of effort.

Each iron has a higher moment of inertia which helps give you a larger sweet spot so you can hit the ball straighter every time. As an added bonus the ball will land cleanly with minimal bounce to give you greater consistency.

This set can also be beneficial to those with a higher handicap.

Key Features
  • Orientation: Right handed
  • Shaft: steel
  • Configuration: 4-PW, GW

4. Wilson Staff-D200 Combo Irons (7 Club Set)

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Wilson Staff-D200 Combo Irons is another set which includes everything you need to help you get out on the course. Ranging from a 5 iron to a Sand Wedge, the iron set uses all the latest technology to help you improve your game.

These irons use Speed Sole Technology, which increases the sweet spot so you can increase your distance, even if you don’t hit the ball cleanly. The irons all have heel and toe weight pods, which help to distribute the weight around the club head for extra speed when hitting the ball.

The design also includes Right Light Technology. Using this, each iron feels solid and well balanced, as the mass is evenly distributed.

This is a good set for all players, but for mid handicappers they can help you increase your accuracy and speed so that you can keep improving your game.

Key Features
  • Orientation: Right handed
  • Shaft: graphite
  • Flex: uniflex
  • Configuration: 5-SW

5. TaylorMade Rocket Bladez 2.0 Iron Set LH 4-PW Steel Stiff

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The TaylorMade Rocket Bladez 2.0 Iron Set is another reliable set from a name you can trust.

The set ranges from a 4 Iron to a Pitching Wedge so it represents excellent value for money.

The set has been designed with Speed Pocket Technology which works to increase your ball speed and distance. The irons have a super-flexible and ultra-thin club face, and this is filled with a specially formulated polyurethane which cushions the vibrations and makes the club feel more comfortable to play with.

The technology also includes an inverted cone shape and a high moment of inertia so you can maintain a consistent distance with every shot.

The center of gravity is lower and more central, so the ball will have a higher peak trajectory, which means a steeper landing, so the ball lands cleanly.

Add to this the green highlights, this is a very professional looking set to be seen with.

Key Features
  • Shaft: Steel
  • Flex: Stiff
  • Configuration: 4-PW

6. Callaway Golf 2018 Men’s Rogue X Irons Set

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While most sets offer a right handed option, the Callaway Golf 2018 Men’s Rogue X Irons Set is designed specifically for left handed players.

The set includes 5 – 9 Irons and a Pitching Wedge, and they all have a steel shaft for extra strength and stability.

These irons are designed to help you with your distance and feature a 360 Face Cup and Variable Face Thickness (VFT). These two features combine to make it easier for you to hit the ball faster. Face Cup uses a flexible rim around the edge of the face, while VFT flexes, so even if you do not hit the ball straight on, you will still benefit from good distance and speed.

Although the club face is thin, it has been enhanced with urethane microspheres. These reduce the vibrations and give the club a much nicer sound and feel.

When compared with the Rogue Standard set, the Rogue X has many advantages. They are lighter, longer and have stronger lofts so it’s easier to get some weight behind the ball. The longer irons all have a precise center of gravity, using Tungsten weighting. This precision gives you better control over the launch of the ball.

Key Features
  • Orientation: Left handed
  • Shaft: steel
  • Flex: regular
  • Configuration:5-9 iron, PW

7. Cobra King F7 Combo Iron Set – 3-PW

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The Cobra King F7 Combo Iron Set is a complete set ranging from a 3 Iron to a Pitching Wedge. Designed for right handed players, they have a steel shaft to give them a good solid base.

These irons have the benefit of all the latest technology to give you a more precise shot with good speed. The face is thin and strong but provides a large sweet spot so if you hit the ball straight on, it will go fast and go far. Even if you mishit the ball, it will still get good speed and distance behind it.

The weight in these irons is around the edge of the face and towards the back of the club head to give you good control and provide plenty of weight behind the ball.

The irons also have grooves to help their performance. The 3-6 irons have V grooves while the 7 iron to Pitching wedge have U grooves. These grooves give the ball extra spin for any shots you play on or around the green.

Key Features
  • Orientation: Right handed
  • Shaft: steel
  • Flex: stiff
  • Configuration: 3-PW

8. Callaway Golf 2019 Big Bertha Iron / Hybrid Combo Set

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The Callaway Golf 2019 Big Bertha Iron / Hybrid Combo Set varies from the other sets we have reviewed as they include a 4 and 5 Hybrid, as well as a 6 iron to Pitching Wedge and an Approach Wedge.

They also come with a graphite shaft so they are lighter and more flexible.

This set has many features to help you including Callaway’s Jailbreak technology. This means the body is stiffened by two internal bars which help to create more impact on the face of the ball. The hybrids also have an OptiFit hosel and this helps to optimize the center of gravity so that you can give the ball a better launch.

The design also has a suspended energy core which includes urethane microspheres. These not only make the irons feel and sound good, but they help cushion the vibrations on impact.

Key Features
  • Orientation: right handed
  • Shaft: graphite
  • Flex: regular
  • Configuration: 4H, 5H, 6-PW, AW

9. Mizuno JPX 850 Forged Iron Set 5-PW GW

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The Mizuno JPX 850 Forged Iron Set has a solid steel shaft and includes a 5 iron to Pitching Wedge and an Approach Wedge.

These irons all have a reinforced frame around the club face, making it easier to hit the ball straight on and it also makes allowances for any mishits. The frame also absorbs some of the vibrations so it is easier for you to hit the ball harder.

The steel shaft gives the irons a solid feel, but the stiff flex means these are more suitable for long hitting players.

Key Features
  • Orientation: Right handed
  • Shaft: steel
  • Flex: stiff
  • Configuration: 5-PW, AW

10. Cleveland Golf 2018 Men’s CBX Wedge

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If you’re looking to add a wedge to your set of irons, then the Cleveland Golf 2018 Men’s CBX Wedge is an excellent choice.

It has a cavity back so the weight is in the right place for mid handicappers and the extra sweet spot allows for those times you don’t hit the ball straight. Feel Balancing Technology also helps with this as it removes weight from the hosel and in doing so the center of gravity is more aligned with the center of the club face.

The wedge also benefits from Tour Zip Grooves which are combined with a milling process to maximize the spin on the ball when you need it most.

This is a versatile wedge to add to any set of irons

Key Features
  • Orientation: Right handed
  • Shaft: steel
  • Flex: wedge
  • Loft: 52 degrees

What is a mid handicapper?

If you’ve been playing for a while, there’s a good chance you’ll be a mid handicapper.

A mid handicapper actually has quite a wide range, and many golfers fall in to this category. Roughly translated, it means you can regularly shoot in the 80’s, or occasionally the 90’s, every time you play a round. A mid handicapper will have a handicap which can be anything from 7 or 8, up to 17 or 18 and USGA statistics suggest that roughly 40% of all golfers fall into this range.

Why do you need the right clubs?

If you’re serious about the game, you need the right tools for the job. It’s no use buying a set designed for professional players when you’re just starting out as they’ll be too refined for you to handle. It’s also worth remembering that no set of clubs will last forever, so there will come a time when you need to find the right set based on your handicap and style of play.

So, if you’re happy playing with the irons you have, why would you want to change them?

  • As you progress in the game you will find your level and develop your own method of play. When you do, you may find that the clubs you started out with are no longer the right ones for you. If you ever feel that you might do a bit better if you had something else, then that’s a sure sign that you need to consider buying a new set. With all sports, there is no right or wrong equipment to use: you have to have whatever feels right for you. Just because a set of clubs costs a lot of money, there is no guarantee that you will feel comfortable using them. Always take your time to make sure you are happy with the set you buy. It’ll be worth it.
  • If you’ve been playing with the same set for a while, then you may notice that they start to look shabby and they may no longer help you with your game. As new technologies are developed, new clubs are released to help different aspects of the game. They become lighter, they can hit the ball harder and they can make a big difference to your game. This doesn’t mean you have to update them every time a new set comes out, but if you’re looking for a set to help keep you on top of your game, you should try to update them every few years if you can.

While many mid handicappers are happy with their game, many want to improve their skills and it can be hard work maintaining your handicap. To do this you need the right set for mid handicappers and with these:

  • You will be able to make the ball fly higher and more cleanly
  • You will find the ball lands on the greens with less bounce

Finding The Right Clubs: Buying Guide

If you fall in to the mid handicapper range and you’re looking for new irons, you need to consider carefully what you actually need and what each set can do. There are a few features you should consider carefully which will help you find the right set.

Shaft

We’ve come a long way from the days of the wooden shaft, and new technology means irons are lighter and more accurate. When looking at the shaft, try to look at how you play and what each shaft can offer. A lot will depend on your swing and how far you can hit the ball, and we’ll take a look at some of the most common options available to you.

  • Graphite

Graphite is the lighter option for a shaft, and this generally weighs between 60-70g. It’s a good shaft to help you create a faster swing. If you have a slower swing or you need the ball to go faster, or even if you have a shoulder problem, then a graphite shaft can help. The lightweight shaft puts less pressure on the shoulders and makes it easier for everyone to swing. One disadvantage of a graphite shaft is that they are a little more expensive, so you will need to think about your budget.

  • Steel

Steel is the heavier shaft, weighing around 90-120g and this is also the cheaper option. The torque of a steel shaft is lower than in graphite ones, and is between 1 – 3°. Many golfers prefer steel as it feels more solid and durable. The extra weight, however, can affect your swing and can knock vital yards off the distance of your shot.

  • Multimaterial

The other option is for irons which use multi material shafts. These are a combination of graphite and steel, with the shaft being predominantly steel with a graphite tip. This combination offers good control, with the graphite tip helping to filter out the vibrations when you hit the ball.

golf club shafts

Shaft flex

You also need to look at the shaft flex when considering the right set of irons. This basically means how much flexibility the shaft has when you hit the ball. The flex is based on your swing so a fast smooth swing will require a different flex to a slow jerky swing.

Every time you hit the ball, the shaft will flex slightly and this could mean that the face of the club is not square onto the ball when you hit it. If you have the wrong shaft flex it can negatively affect the accuracy, trajectory and distance of your shot.

Here are some guidelines to help you work out which is the best flex for you and your game. You will need to focus on a few aspects of your game to determine the right flex.

Distance

  • Stiff flex/S flex. This is for those who carry their driver over 250 yards
  • Regular flex/ R flex. This is for those who carry their driver 230 – 250 yards
  • A flex / senior. This is for those who carry their driver 200 – 230 yards
  • L flex / ladies. This is for those who carry their driver less than 200 yards
  • X flex / extra stiff: this is for the real big hitters and for most of us we will not need the extra stiff

Swing

You will also need to take a look at your swing, find some swing tips here.

  • If you have a smooth swing, you need a softer flex
  • If you have a jerky swing, you will need a stiffer flex

Direction

  • If you drive to the left you will need a stiffer flex
  • If you drive to the right you will need a softer flex

This can all seem very confusing, so if in doubt seek out the advice of your local golf pro. They will be able to guide you based on your game and your style of play. It’s worth taking the time to get this right or you may lose control of the ball altogether.

Shaft length

One very important consideration when buying new irons is the length of the shaft. If you’re short, then you won’t be able to handle a longer shaft, and similarly a taller person won’t get on well with a shorter shaft. Many sets come with fixed lengths, though, so if you are very tall or very short, you may find you need a custom set.

Thankfully there are options to try before you buy. Some clubs have demo days where you can try out clubs to find the best fit for you and discuss the options available. It’s always worth visiting these when you are thinking of replacing your irons as you also get to experience different types of irons and you pick up some useful information in what to look for.

Loft and Lie

This is something you will need to work on once you have decided on the set of irons you want and your club professional is often the best place to start with this. They will be able to help you test this so that you can get your clubs adjusted if you need to

When you hit the ball, the lie angle of the head is very important and this is something which can be rectified.

  • If the toe of the iron points down, you may find it drags on the grass. When this happens, it will turn the angle of the club head and the ball will veer to the right.
  • If the toe of the iron is pointing up, the heel of the club will dig in to the grass, and this will cause the ball to veer to the left.

Your height can also make a difference to your loft and lie with shorter players needing a flatter lie, while taller players fare better with the angle a little higher.

Many manufacturers also offer a fitting service so the irons can be adjusted to your height and swing. It’s always worth asking if this service is available before you actually buy.

Club head

Club heads play a vital role in the direction of the ball. Their constructions involve casting them or forging them. This refers to the system used when they are made and most players use cast heads.

  • Cast heads are made by pouring the molten metal in to a premade mould. These heads are generally cheaper and are easier to handle. Be careful, though, if you see a cast head advertised as being softer. If the head is too soft it can mean the ball won’t travel as far as it should.
  • Forged heads are more expensive because the metal is beaten in to shape. The steel used tends to be softer and they can provide more control than a cast head. These heads are generally preferred by more experienced players with a low handicap.

To give you the cleanest shot you also need to consider the design of your club head. The choice is between cavity back irons or muscle back/blade irons.

Muscle back irons have less forgiveness and are generally used by professionals and those with a very low handicap. Mid handicappers should look for a cavity back.

taylormade m6 iron

Advantages of cavity back irons:

Cavity back irons include some features which are beneficial to all mid handicappers.

  • Perimeter weighting. These are called cavity back because there is a cavity at the back of the head and this adds perimeter weighting. If you use a muscle back iron and don’t hit the sweet spot, you will find that the weight of the club vibrates so much that it hurts your fingers. This perimeter weighting will give you more weight when you hit the ball and it also creates a larger sweet spot.
  • Wide sole. A cavity back will have a wider sole than a muscle back and this helps to reduce the center of gravity of the club. This means that when you hit the ball you can get more weight behind it and the result is a smooth arching high ball. Thanks to this the ball will have extra bounce when it hits the ground and won’t just drop on to the earth.
  • Hosel. Cavity back irons have an offset hosel which can be very beneficial if you struggle to get some height in the ball. The big advantage to an offset hosel is that the center of gravity alters so even if you don’t hit the ball cleanly you can still launch it well.

One thing you need to be wary of when looking for new irons, are the sets which say they are tour preferred or have pro in their name. These are not the best choice for mid handicappers as they are generally designed for more experienced or professional players. You won’t benefit from using these but once your game has improved enough, then you will be keen to try them out.

Grips

Once you have decided on the right set of irons, you will need to check out grips. These won’t last as long as your irons and you will probably need to change them every 40-50 rounds.

Like everything else in the game, these need to be just right to make sure your game doesn’t suffer. Here are some things you need to consider.

Feel

This is the most important because if the grips aren’t comfortable for you, you won’t feel confident using them. There is no one rule about how they should feel and this is mainly down to your swing. Some players like a firm grip while others prefer a little less friction.

Material

You should consider your local climate when you are thinking about the material for your grips. If you live in a hot, dry climate you will need different grips to a golfer who lives in a colder, damp one.

  • Rubber is the most popular choice of grip and can be used in any climate.
  • Corded grips are rubber grips which have brushed cotton sticking out of it. This gives the grip a coarse feel and are the better option for a more damp or humid climate. They also absorb moisture from your hands so if you have sweaty palms, these will help you grip.
  • You can also get wrap grips which are made from durable material which are soft to the touch. These are available in thick or thin sizes and many prefer the thicker grip, though this can restrict the action of your wrist. A thinner grip is better if you need to use a lot of wrist action.

Soft or firm

If you hold your iron with a firm grip, you will need a softer grip and if you have a light grip you will need a harder grip.

  • Firm grips are used more by experienced players and pros as they don’t need hold the irons so hard in order to control them.
  • Softer grips are more suitable for beginners and older players as they are more comfortable to control.

Size

This is the one thing many players get wrong with their grips. There are 5 sizes of grip: junior, undersize, standard, midsize and oversize. Here is a rough guide as to what these mean:

  • Junior: These are smaller than standard ones and have a range of sizes.
  • Undersize: 1/64” smaller than standard
  • Standard: 0.580” to 0.60” in diameter.
  • Midsize: 1/16” larger than standard
  • Oversize: 1/8” larger than standard

What you need in a set of irons?

When you’re looking for a set of irons one of the first things you need to consider is what you actually need in your set. You will usually have 10 irons, including wedges. There is a lot of flexibility in what you buy for your set, but these are the irons you will have to choose from. Most sets include a definite range so you will need to work out what you need based on your own distances.

You need your irons when you are closer to the green, and the closer you are, the higher the iron number you will need. Each iron is designed for a set loft, so this won’t vary for each numbered iron.

A set usually includes:

  • 3 Iron – 18° loft
  • 4 Iron – 20° loft
  • 5 Iron – 23° loft
  • 6 Iron – 26° loft
  • 7 Iron – 30° loft
  • 8 Iron – 34.5° loft
  • 9 Iron – 39° loft
  • Pitching Wedge. This is used for longer shots to the green, which can be up to 120 yards. These have a loft of between 46-50 degrees.

You can also get:

  • Sand Wedge. As the name suggests, these are often used for bunkers, and they have a loft of 54-58 degrees.
  • Approach or Gap Wedge. These have a loft of 50-55 degrees.
  • Lob Wedge. This is used for shorter distances and has a loft of over 60 degrees.

Price

This is often the big consideration for everyone and as with everything, the better your budget, the better the quality of your irons will be. This doesn’t mean that you have to spend as much as you possibly can to get the right set of irons for you, but to get the full benefit from your irons and to make sure they last, try to get the best you can afford.

Ideally you are looking at a set of irons to last you between 3 to 5 years. That’s not to say you can’t use them for longer if you have grown accustomed to them, but new technology means that newer clubs will be even better adapted to help your game.

Ask around

if you’re really not sure where to start, ask your fellow players and club members. The club shop should be able to offer you advice on what to look for to help improve your game. Once you start to ask around you will find that other players have plenty of good advice to offer and can also advise you of some of the pitfalls to look out for. It’s no good buying a set of golf clubs because you like the look of them if someone you play with has tried them and found that they are simply not up to the job.

Buying new irons is not something which can be rushed. It’s often better to continue to play with your existing set than to buy the first set you see. You will need to examine your game and work out exactly what you want to achieve so that you can find the right set of irons for you.

FAQs

How do I know if I’m a mid handicapper?

The scope of what constitutes a mid handicapper is very broad and there is no set definition. Broadly speaking mid handicappers:

  • Regularly shoot between 80-90, sometimes going in to the 90s.
  • Will have a handicap of between 7 and 20
  • Are able to hit the ball solidly, but still need some forgiveness in their clubs.
  • Play on average 1-3 times a week.

Should I use forged or cast irons?

There is no hard and fast rule and for many players this is down to personal preference. To help you decide though:

  • Forged irons are made as one piece and these tend to be favored by professionals and low handicappers.
  • Cast irons tend to be the better option for mid handicappers as they provide a little more forgiveness.

Which irons should I buy?

Your set should include 10 irons and this includes wedges. Which ones you buy is down to your game and what you want to achieve. As a general rule, the lower numbered irons will provide less distance to the higher numbered ones. There is usually 12-15 yards difference between each numbered iron. If you need the distance, choose a set with higher numbers.

Then decide which wedges you need. Most sets come with a pitching wedge and it certainly pays to have a choice of other wedges such as an approach wedge or a sand wedge.

Can I change the loft and lie as my game improves?

Yes you can, but check before you buy to make sure that this is possible. When you first use your new irons your loft and lie will be adapted to your current game. As you progress and improve, your swing will alter and your loft and lie will change, so it’s important to get irons which can be adjusted.

Cast irons are harder to adjust than forged irons. They can usually only be altered by a couple of degrees or there is a risk of them breaking. Forged irons can be bent a little further and some irons have a hosel which is designed to help you adjust this.

Where’s the best place to buy golf irons?

The best place to buy is the place where you have seen the right set, but before you do, look around. There are many places you can buy golf clubs so compare what’s on the market and what different manufacturers offer.

Online: With more and more people using the internet, it’s becoming easier to get everything we need online. If you’re looking at golf clubs, however, check carefully before you make that investment. One thing you do need to remember is that online stores may not be able to help if your clubs need adjusting.

  • Does the company have a good returns policy?
  • How easy would it be to return them?
  • Do they offer a warranty?
  • What have other people said in reviews about the company?

If you see anything you’re not happy with, don’t buy from them.

Store: A sports store is a great place to buy clubs, because you can see and feel them before you buy them. Some stores also have open days so you can actually try the irons out first. You also have someone who can answer questions and who can offer you some advice.

You will still need to check out their returns policy and warranty, but it is easier to return them to a store than it is to an online company and they may be able to help with any adjustments.

Golf shop: Most golf clubs have a shop and these are excellent places to go for help and advice with buying your new clubs. As they specialize in golf, they are likely to be able to answer more technical questions and find out more in depth what you want to get out of the clubs.

Returning them won’t be a problem if you play regularly and if they can’t do it themselves, they will likely know who to recommend if you need any adjustments.

Which shaft is best: graphite or steel?

This really is down to personal preference and budget.

  • Graphite is lighter than steel and players with a shoulder injury will find them easier to play with. They’re also better if you have a slower swing, as they are easier to swing.
  • Steel shafts are solid but heavier, and are better if you have a fast swing.

What does offset mean?

There are so many options available that it can get a little difficult trying to understand everything. An offset iron means the club face sits behind the shaft. You can check this by looking straight down an iron. The more offset the club face is, the more forgiveness it will provide.

If you hook your shots, you may need an iron with some offset, but not too much.

When should I buy new irons?

With improvements being made all the time, it’s hard to keep up with all the latest innovations without replacing your clubs. That doesn’t mean you should change them every time a new feature is added.

Your clubs are an investment and only you can decide how long you want that investment to last. Many players use the same set happily for years but eventually the clubs will show signs of wear and tear and then you know it’s time to look at a new set.

There is also a personal reason to change them: because you know you need to. When you first start playing you will need all the help you can get. As your game improves, you will be looking for different things from your clubs and once you start to feel that they could give you ‘something more’, that’s when you need to find a set to match your game.

As a mid handicapper why should I not buy Tour or Pro irons?

Golf irons which are advertised with the words ‘Tour’ and ‘Pro’ might look good in your golf bag, but unless you’re an experienced player they’re likely to do more harm than good for your game.

Mid handicappers need some forgiveness, like a bigger sweet spot. Pro irons are designed for players who hit the ball straight on every time and who need no help with their speed or accuracy. They are fine tuned and offer no forgiveness. If you try these you will likely become very frustrated.

What is a hybrid?

Hybrids are becoming more popular and you may want to exchange one of your irons for a hybrid.

A hybrid is a cross between a wood and an iron. They are designed to replace the longer irons, as these can be difficult to use consistently.

Hybrids are very versatile and they can be used off the tee, off the fairway or from the rough. Longer irons can be tricky to use as it’s hard to get the speed you need, and this is where hybrids can help. They have a deeper face-to-back than traditional irons, and this produces more perimeter weighting, which moves the center of gravity. This makes it easier to get some height in the ball. If you’re stuck in the rough, hybrids have a smoother edge so they don’t get caught on the grass.

While many irons have a steel shaft, hybrids are mostly made using graphite shafts. This helps you hit the ball with that extra speed to help get the distance. They also have a lower flex point, which produces the lift you need.

When looking at a hybrid, if you want to replace a 3 iron, you need a 3 hybrid as they will both be configured for the same distance and loft.

What can I do about vibrations?

Unless you hit a golf ball in the sweet spot every time, you will get vibrations through the club. For some these are hardly noticeable, but for others they can be quite a problem. There are a number of features you can look for in a golf iron which can help to block the vibrations.

One way is to find an iron which increases the sweet spot. The greater this is, the less chance you have of feeling any vibrations. There are a number of ways that golf club manufacturers can do this and one way is to lower the center of gravity.

Cavity backs include perimeter weighting. This moves the center of gravity to the edges of the club head, and so increases the sweet spot.

Some shafts also include technology to help reduce vibrations and you should ask about this when you go to research a new set.

What if my handicap improves?

If you’re using the right set of irons, then there’s no reason why your handicap and your game won’t improve. If it does, you may want to change your irons again to allow for the improvements in your game.

Many mid handicappers improve their game but still stay in the mid handicap range. What you will need to look for is how your game has changed and that can tell you what you will need in your next set of irons.

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